makeup artist

New Beauty Work!

I don't often share shoots on here but I am so happy with this story I cant help myself! I've included all the products I used in case anything catches your eye.

Hope you like!


Skin (in all photos): Dr Organics Manuka Honey Rescue Cream (available at Holland & Barrett), Make Up For Ever HD Corrector in Green, Illamasqua Hydra Veil, Make Up For Ever HD Foundation, Revlon Skinlights (available at Superdrug), Embryolisse Balm Secours dabbed on high points of the face.

Brows: Make Up For Ever Waterproof Brow Corrector (Available at www.preciousaboutmakeup.com) and Art Deco Eye Brow Filler (Available at Debenhams)

Eyes: Avon Extra Lasting Eye Liner Pen, Make Up For Ever Black Eyeshadow

Lips: Make Up For Ever flash colour in pink, Make Up For Ever blush brushed over in Neon Pink.




Skin and brows as above.

Eyes: Make Up For Ever Eyeshadow in 302 Diamond Turquoise, Boots No7 Lash Adapt Mascara.

Lips: Nars Lip Gloss in Wonder.






Skin and Brows as above.

Eyes: Vaseline, Make Up For Ever Eyeshadow in 33 Slate Grey (All Make Up For Ever products available at www.preciousaboutmakeup.com)

Lips: A mix of Suedeberry and Red velvet Lime Crime Velvetines. (Available at http://www.love-makeup.co.uk

Credits:

Hair and makeup by me (www.lucymc-makeup.co.uk)
Photography and retouch by Paul Waring (http://www.castmodels.co.uk/#!paul-waring/crbm)
Model is Jess Watkins at Cast Models

Do you know what you should never do?

You should never ever, ever put makeup on one side of your face, leave the other side bare then take photographs. That is what you should never do.

I decided -as I had had an exponentially long break from blogging - I would return with a bang and do a "half face makeup"...I sat happily working on one side of my face all warm and cosy on the sofa. Surrounded by makeup and cats and good lighting. I was happy. Then came time to take the pictures. 

Ladies and gents: If you ever want to feel both older than your years and extremely shallow all the same time then this is the exercise for you.

I've always been one of "those" people who proudly declare that they don't wear much makeup. After all I have good skin for a 32 year old, my freckles look nice when they aren't covered and I'm generally cool with being bare faced. 

NOT ANY MORE.

I've learnt two valuable lessons from torturing myself this way though. 1. If you don't look like one of the beautiful Chapman sisters then ALWAYS makeup both sides of your face and 2. The time has come for me to make the extra effort and wear makeup. For the good of mankind. 

I am now more thankful than ever for the gift of makeup application. From the bottom of my soul I am grateful as it means I can change my funny looking face.

And on that note I shall leave you with the results. Sorry about me.





And what I usually look like with lip balm and concealer




These things are not OK. OK?

With the dawn of a digital age and the fact that the world and her wife have access to the internet, free website makers, url's being at an all time low price etc etc it can often seem like the universe has been flooded with "creatives" who woke up one day and thought "Oh I have loads of makeup already and I can do a mean smoky eye on myself...I must be a makeup artist!". Actually it doesn't seem like that, that is exactly how it is.

Like anything this has pros and cons for our industry. Pros being raised awareness of what we do, more market choice and my favourite, the freedom and availability of information to do with our trade. The cons are so numerous I almost feel sick thinking about it.


What happens when lots and lots of unqualified, inexperienced people suddenly decide that what we do isnt really that difficult? Well the biggest thing I see is that ethics go out the window. Morals disappear. The hunger for a tiny slab of success or the ability to say "oh I became a makeup artist once, it was easy" literally make people go insane.


With all this in mind I thought I would write about the top "no no's" that I see on a daily basis. They started when the internet became the most viable and instantaneous way of marketing ourselves and our work. It is not exclusively reserved for makeup artists either. I think most of these faux pas apply to freelance creatives as a whole. Its a community issue!


Number 1: Image theft.


Here's the scenario. Someone leaves college. They don't want to have to graft to the top like the rest of us because you know, that would mean working. So they get themselves a web designer, hand over a load of photos that they have plucked from different artists and photographers sites and get them to make a pretty little portfolio for them. A portfolio which contains absolutely none of their handy work. When caught out, said web designer provides them with a cover story. "It wasnt me, my web designer did it and it went live before I could stop them!" Yeah...thats not how things work.


The sad thing is that the first part of that last paragraph is inaccurate. Its not just newbies that do this. Over the course of 10 years I have come across top level, serious award winning artists that have thought a good way of filling a gap in their portfolio was to simply take it from another artist. The most recent was a woman who has half the internet (including professional organisations) convinced she is some Lisa Eldridge level celebrity makeup artist who has worked on everyone from the Spice Girls to U2. Done every event, award ceremony, festival. You name it. She even has a show reel full of clips from films she never set foot on. Before myself and another artist uncovered her lies, her whole online portfolio and professional branding was chock full of stolen work. Estee Lauder campaigns, magazine covers and celebrities she has never so much as glanced at from across a room. The scariest thing is that people believe her because "the internet" says so. You put up a website, throw the word celebrity around and gather some pictures up from wherever you like and people will buy it. Terrifying huh? This particular person now has no online portfolio. Once the relevant artists were informed that she had stolen from them and she was flat out told to remove the work she literally had nothing left.


This is NOT ok. There is such a thing called copyright and intellectual property rights when it comes to the legal aspect but what about the moral aspect? Ripping people off for what? Once these people get found out their reputation never recovers and their career is over. Simple as that.


Number 2: Lying on your resume/CV


I can keep this short and sweet. If you claim to have been published in "Vogue" or say you have worked on a number of celebrities and you haven't  people can tell. They can tell by the quality of your work. So you look ridiculous and you can bet your life that people will be talking about you behind your back for all the wrong reasons.


Number 3: Constant tweeting and retweeting of praise...(includes facebook and blog posts)


Now don't get me wrong, blogging in any form always has a certain level of self involvement. The very act of starting a blog usually means you think someone is going to read it. The difference lies in the content. I will skip over the sheer horror of the grammar I see on some popular blogs and just concentrate on what I like to call "Ego Bloggers" or "Daily Mail Bloggers".


I love seeing people succeed. Especially when they are lovely, and talented and generous and humble. What I don't like is people who do nothing but gloat and brag and retweet sycophantic tweets ALL day and night. Why do these people think we need to read it 20 times in the space of an hour? We get it, you've done something mediocre that the world MUST know about or human kind will die out.


What these people don't realise is that real working, jobbing artists don't have time. People who are successful and working simply cannot spend that much time on social media. These little things called actual jobs get in the way you see. Real, working pros also think that the above type of people are hilarious pillars of amusement. They might not come out and say it. They may even follow these people because its funny but behind the scenes we pass them off as amateurs who are in it for an ego boost. Don't believe me? Go and look at the twitter pages of the top top artists. Alex Box, Val "The Queen" Garland, Alex Babsky, Jane Bradley etc. then compare that with post for praisers and you will get my point.


Can I also just add that if you ever see me doing any of the above, please stage an intervention. Thanks!


Number 4: Sticking the word "celebrity" in front of makeup artist when you have done one Z lister/reality star.


NO. Just stop it. Its embarassing. If you actually look at the artists who work on celebrities for 99% of their career, even they dont call themselves that! STOP IT.


This post has turned out far more ranty than I orginally intended but its better out than in. I would LOVE you to share some of your industry pet hates in the comments! Let it out guys and dolls...let it out.

Mini post- Making a foundation from scratch!


You just need some grease paints and a slight knowledge of colour theory. I used Make Up For Ever Flash Colours for this but Kryolan, Ben Nye and Grimas do brilliant versions.



1. Take small amounts of your primary colours. Red, yellow and blue plus small swatches of white and black.
2. Mix them all together so you get your base. It should look like mud!
3. Add more white or black depending on your skin shade.
4. Adjust with more yellow, blue or red depending on your undertones.

Voila! A custom made perfectly matched foundation or concealer for you or your client.

The Tangled Web of Rates and Charging for Your Skills.

I have been contemplating writing a post on rates for a while now but I couldn't find an angle to approach it from. Then I came across a "casting call" on a popular portfolio hosting site. It was posted by a UK based makeup artist working in London and surrounding areas offering her freelance services for £8 per hour. This enraged me to the point that an angle was no longer needed and I just needed to get this post written down and out of my system.

Firstly, £8 an hour is only acceptable in an employed environment such as shops and offices. Secondly, I looked at her work and she is a VERY new artist which is why her rate means she will run her business at a loss and probably starve to death in a doorway using her tattered kit bag as a pillow. Being angry always makes me so dramatic.



The Basics.


All the above aside for a moment...You should not be charging for your services until you deserve to be paid. By this I mean that you need to be able to unequivocally handle anything a client throws at you (metaphorically speaking. I don't want new artists thinking people may actually throw things at them). You need to know your place in the team without questioning yourself. You need to understand how a set works and most importantly you need to know your job inside out and back to front. You need to have worked on every skin type and tone and be able to work as proficiently on every model, actress and person that sits in your chair. You need confidence to make your opinions valid as a client is paying for your knowledge as well as your time, supplies and skills.



"OK smarty pants, how do I support myself?!"


Very simple. You take a different job while you learn your craft. Any job. I worked for a makeup company on counter and LOVED it. Its great experience and the discounts mean your kit will grow to a healthy workable size. You can use your days off and holiday time to assist and build your book. College and school and all these millions of courses only teach you the basics. They don't teach you how to handle a model melt down, an unhappy client, a client who doesn't have the first clue about makeup and therefore cannot tell you what they want, the list is ENDLESS. The only way you can learn these things is by testing and assisting. Assisting experienced working artists allows you to see all these processes in action. It also allows you to see how professional artists handle these things in the context of a professional set. You get to observe and listen and watch and absorb everything without the pressure of a bad decision ruining your career before you have even started.



Life Lessons


I know at least one artist who is phenomenal  They are a far better artist than me. They live in a major market (London) yet their career is stuck in the same place it was 6 years ago because they tried to run before they could walk. A few naive decisions and judgements later, word has spread, they have a reputation as a flake and mud -as they say- sticks. That is quite literally all it takes.


Rates at the moment is such an important issue. Since I started this 10 years ago, I have seen a massive rise in the number of "artists" and a steady decline in rates and its not just because our economy is on its arse. Its because schools/courses/classes are not teaching fundamental business skills or industry standards in pay. These courses happily take your money but they don't comprehensively tell you how to make it back in the future. So what are you actually paying for? You are paying to enhance a skill you already have only to be pushed into a market that is so over saturated with people who don't have a clue that it drives down rates for every single one of us.



How to Starve to Death in London


Back to £8 an hour girl...Lets work this out logically. To start with she does 3 portfolio tests with a net photographer a week (this is me being optimistic)...8 hours per shoot give or take. That's £64 a day. Take off her travel, that cheeky coffee on the way, the lashes she needs, the baby wipes and other disposables and right there you shave off £15. So shes left with £49. Lets round it up to £50 just to throw around yet more optimism, why not? So now as a self employed woman, she wont be paying tax on that income but what about her national insurance contributions? If her income nudges slightly above what I have used as an example a further 9% of her income goes to class 4 NI and regardless of how much she earns she has to pay another £2.65 (as of 2012-2012) a week in class 2 contributions. This will leave her with less than £150 a week to live on. For everything. Rent, bills, food, kit replenishment, travel to jobs etc. All this is based on my eternal optimism that she will do 3 jobs a week with no reputation, no contacts to people who are actually working and no clue of how to run her business. Yes she may make a bit more during wedding season but what about the dry spells? What about for the few weeks over Christmas when everything winds down? The few weeks a year when it dips a little? I am sure you now see my point. 



Industry Standards vs Consumer Perceptions


As a freelancer you never know conclusively how much money you will make from one job to the next. You also never know when that client will action your invoice and actually give you your hard earned cash. In fact, I (and most freelancers I know) spend more time chasing money than they do on set. I wont even get into how they will haggle and try not to pay you at all. Yawn.


Survival and living reasons aside, there is another very important reason why £8 per hour is a completely unacceptable rate (hourly rates like that are not industry standard in print and commercial work regardless of how high you set it but I will address this later). Undercutting your fellow artist will make you very unpopular very quickly. Alienating your peers in this industry is a bad idea for a whole host of reasons that I am sure you can work out for yourself. Undercutting is a sign of desperation and clearly points to someone who isn't ready to be working. This in turn drives down rates and maybe more importantly confidence in our profession. Someone who isn't ready to be working charges this ridiculously cheap rate, does a bad job, client gets what they paid for....I mean client loses confidence. Some are often left with the opinion "We will just have the model do it next time and the photographer can fix things in post..." Wonderful, hey?


This is also about WORTH. Good makeup artists are worth their weight in gold (har har har). Our main job on a working set is to save the photographer hours of retouch. We came into fruition for this very purpose. To make people look amazing on camera before photoshop when it would take lab techs and photographers days and days to repaint negatives. "How about we get someone to just paint it out on the person?" I am sure some very clever person said one day. For the record I don't think this is how we came into being but poetic licence seems to have gotten the better of me. Still, you get my point right? If you can see it in the flesh the photographer has to retouch it. Simple as that. Undercutting other artists damages your worth then filters down to the rest of us. Not cool. For example, I had this conversation a few weeks ago:



Lady: Oh the girl doing our wedding party is only charging £10 a face! You should so do that Lucy! I mean shes getting £70 just for a mornings work...
Me: Nah, I don't really do weddings and when I do its at least £70 just for the brides trial and I am not considered expensive...
Lady: SEVENTY POUNDS?! Seventy whole pounds just to SLAP ON A BIT OF MAKEUP?! Pfft...no wonder you don't do weddings. It only took that girl 5 minutes.
Me in my head: No, YOU are exactly the reason I don't do weddings. *RAGE*

You see? A shoddy artist literally "slaps on a bit of makeup" while charging silly prices and automatically people associate this with every one of us. They don't take into account the length of time you've been working, your skill level, the service you give and the time you take they just think you are the same because that's all they have experienced. In one morning Little Miss £10 A Face devalued us to at least 7 potential clients.

How do we charge?


One major problem in this industry is that we are cagey about how much we charge. If we don't share, how will others actually learn? You can walk into shops and find the prices right there on the shelf and as freelancers we are a product. Its a shame we don't come in a box to be honest as we wouldn't have a lot of these issues if people had to pluck us from a shelf and pay for us at a till....but I digress. I learnt how to price and charge through mentors when I just started out telling me their rates and helping me understand. So I am going to be honest with you lovely readers. Generally its a flat half and full day rate. For big commercial gigs my personal day rate is fixed at £350 for a full day (8 hours) and £200 for half day (4 hours). Editorial doesn't usually pay much and many magazines just offer you the pages, credit and cover expenses. Its up to you to decide if the tear sheets will add value to your book and so increase your work flow. Look books, catalogues, shows etc. I personally don't have set rate. Its a case by case basis and I try to offer a little flexibility for the client (especially if they are a new designer) without pricing myself too low. Rates also differ by area. I am in Liverpool at the moment so my rate will be lower than London or NYC for example.

Find a senior artist in your area who needs an assistant and will mentor you. Good, confident artists wont mind sharing their skills and knowledge with you because they are secure in their own ability. They wont fear you as competition and in turn they wont mind you knowing how much they make.

So get out there, assist your fabulous butts off then go and make some money! Secure your worth and believe that you are worth paying. Every time you turn away a job that wants to pay you pennies because you're "new" and every time you refuse to work for no money (not tests) you are increasing not only the respect you have for your talent but the respect everyone has for our profession. We need to stick together to keep our beautiful, beloved industry valuable!

Behind the Scenes with Lisa E Moss Jewellery and Olympian Natasha Jonas



I don't often do behind the scenes posts but I had such an amazing time on this job, I thought I would give you all a sneaky peek of some of the looks and concepts we covered over a chilly weekend in The Home of Champions, the Rotunda boxing club in Liverpool.

Not only did Natasha Jonas look absolutely amazing in Lisa's beautiful pieces but the whole vibe of the shoot was relaxed and creative. All in all, a marvellous way to spend a weekend!

Natasha is a champion boxer and was the first British woman to ever fight in any single Olympic games, ever. How ridiculously awesome is that?! You can read more about her and her well 'ard self here.

Lisa took inspiration not only from Natasha but boxing in general for this collection and as such, many of the pieces focus on the hands. Draping wrist chains and swags on rings with one piece even emulating the tape boxers use to bind their hands before putting on their gloves. Toughness mixed with soft femininity really captures Natasha's style and has made for a truly unique and wearable medley of beautiful jewels. It has also given Lisa many, many sleepless nights as she hand makes every single piece. Dedication or what?! When you see the level of detail and artistry in each piece the fact that they are handmade blows your mind!

Hope you enjoy the behind the scenes shots and be sure to check out more of Lisa's amazing jewellery here and look out for this new collection in TWENTY8TWELVE stores in London.

 
While I was doing Natasha's makeup there was a full on circuit training class going on behind her! Probably the most surreal view I have ever had whilst doing makeup.




The above were the cheeky "can you tell who it is yet?" pics for twitter! Lisa waited until the shoot was well under way before releasing who the model was for her new collection "Laughing Assassin" (which Natasha has been called!)






 
As you can see above, the looks were a mix of boyish, street cool and flirty tough glamour. When the final shots come out you will see I tried to reflect that in her makeup. The first look I did was a silver smoky eye with some contouring and a glossy nude lip and for the latter, I did a modern, gritty take on a 60's eye. 



Half way through the second day Natasha had to fulfil a commitment to an exceptionally important cause for Liverpool (and pretty much all of football) and that was to film a section of the new video for the charity release of You'll Never Walk Alone by Gerry and The Pacemakers. All the proceeds go to helping the victims of the Hillsborough disaster. So she changed from a glam, girly dress into her boxing gear and her whole body language instantly changed to "Fighter"...very cool, very intimidating and ultimately awesome.



For an unplanned shot, Natasha's ridiculously beautiful Mum joined her on set. I don't think I have ever met a more glamorous, stunning Mum in my entire life and Esther could easily pass for Tasha's sister! 

And if awesome, strong and brilliant women weren't enough we had the most delicious food courtesy of Ragga's Cafe on Smithdown Road. I would ever get tired of eating their curried goat or their amazing, warm festivals! Plus their Ackee n Saltfish took me back to my childhood and trips to Notting hill Carnival with my late Dad. Mmmmmm!



On our first day shooting Natasha was attending the Liverpool Style Awards to present the lovely Rebecca Ferguson with an award for music and I did her makeup for the event! If you look closely you will also spot some of Lisa's new collection.


And...just for you guys here is an exclusive and very, very tiny glimpse of Lisa's new collection. See how much I love you? (and I really do. The loyal readers of this blog have not only made me very happy but also I know you are supporting the wonderful businesses I have mentioned here and that makes my heart swell! Thank you x 100000000!)

Hope you enjoyed reading about it as much as I enjoyed shooting it! Next blog post is hopefully going to be about colour theory, if I can master writing about something so technical. In the meantime if there is a particular topic or question you want me to answer just pop it in the comments box below OR email me ukmakeupartist@gmail.com

Inspiration

I was looking through my photos this afternoon as I am about to do a big print run for my book. It occured to me how much I look to nature to get inspiration for the looks I do. From shells, to moths to the "heavens" I find the colour combinations and textures that nature creates to be both breath taking and extremely helpful when it comes to designing makeup.

Heres my most recent beauty story as an example and the scenes that inspired each shot!




                     


In My Kit: The Things I Cannot Live Without.

I was asked by a lovely reader to do a post about the essential products in my kit. This was hard because I am a complete makeup junkie and love everything I currently carry. There are some products -such as my beloved Face and Body foundation that I reviewed in a previous post- and tools that I will be forever faithful to though and maybe surprisingly, they aren't all makeup. I have chosen 6 products that I simply couldn't work without.


Number 1

Make Up For Ever Flash/12 Colour Case

The Makeup Artist's Dozen


Where to start with this wonder palette?! Well lets use a scary imaginary situation.

I rush out the door to a shoot, kit in tow. A few steps from my front door I realise I have left my brushes and my flash palette behind, so I run back and pop the two in my handbag rather than open my kit up. Between my home and the job my kit spontaneously combusts (typing that made me feel a little sick, I cant lie to you) and after I am done sobbing I realise I still have a job to do. I reach in my bag to grab a tissue and see this beautiful little wonder shining back at me and I realise that even though my entire kit is now in ashy pieces all over a Liverpool Street....all is ok. I have my Flash Case. The End.

Seriously dudes, its THAT good. You can do an entire face of makeup with this little baby alone. If you understand colour theory (and newbies this should be something you learn first and foremost. Teach yourself to mix foundation from primary colours plus white and black and you will thank me when you realise you can now match foundation to anyone pretty much by sight alone) you can create a foundation. It can be used for blush, eye shadow (the blue on my summer beauty shots is mixed from this palette) and lips. You can even use the black as a mascara at a push. For the latter you would have to be careful of it transferring as its a grease but you still could technically do it.  If I forgot this on a job I would actually panic and its the only product in my kit that would provoke such a reaction in all honesty. Buy it! Available at www.preciousaboutmakeup.com


Number 2

Stila All Over Blending Brush #9

Superior 217? Maybe.
I have had this brush for going on 8 years. It has never lost one hair and its fibres are still in perfect condition. Its not just the longevity of this brush that makes me love it so much though. It blends like no other brush I have tried. Whether you use soft circular motions or simply swipe across a shadow line it always delivers.

It can also be used to dust power over under eye concealer for precision setting power and to apply light coats of shadow if you want to layer.



 Number 3

Embryolisse Lait Creme Concentrate

Plumped to perfection
Put simply this is the ultimate moisturiser. From flaky to fabulous in minutes, it plumps and softens the skin to make foundation application flawless. Considering its so rich it sinks into the skin in seconds and doesn't leave an oily residue. The new lotion version comes in a very large pump dispenser and is a lighter consistency which makes it perfect for body application.  Also available at Precious About Makeup



Number 4

Parian Spirit

Lemony Goodness
Citrus based with no harsh chemicals, it smells delicious and is gentle on even your most delicate brushes. Can be spritzed over brushes in between looks to instantly sanitise alternatively you can soak brushes for 5-15 for a deep clean. It evaporates quickly so you aren't left waiting around to be able to use your brushes for an eternity. I like to keep some in a little bowl on my workstation so I can instantly rid my favourite brushes of colour, ready for the next look. Buy now at Precious About Makeup

  
Number 5

Costco/Kirkland Baby Wipes

Cheap n Chic
"Baby wipes?! What the deuce?!" I hear you say....I don't know how any artist manages without a baby wipe to hand. I use them to wipe over surfaces, clean my palette (the back of my hand), cleanse and remove makeup, wipe brushes...You name it, these bad boys get used for it. The reason I like Costco ones so much is because not only are they cheap (huge box of 6 packets for about £7/8) but they are so, so gentle. They feel like a wet cloth and have no horrible scent. They are soft and efficient. I couldnt do a job without them.


Number 6


Rimmel Extreme Definition Clear Mascara


It doesn't necessarily have to be this brand but clear mascara has become a firm staple of my kit.  I use it not only to give lashes definition when I am doing a really natural look but also to hold brows in place.  My favourite way to use it is to mix in pigments (Make Up For Ever are my faves!) to create coloured mascara. I pour some out onto a palette, tap in some pigment and use a small brush to paint the lashes. I usually paint them white first, then add the colour over the top to make the colour really pop. I have also used it to create coloured liquid liner as it dries to a liner like texture. It saves me carrying lots of different coloured mascaras and liners and as we all know, the smaller we can get our kits the better! On the following shoot- from about 4 years ago (oh how time flies!)- I used it with some neon eyeshadows (Stargazer I think) to colour the eyebrow and once on a film, the director wanted a single tear last minute, with no glycerine to hand this stepped up and saved the day!

I would love to hear what some of your kit favourites are. What can't you live without?